Tornado Watch

We’ve had rather inclement weather here in Florida these last few days.  And as per usual, our weather forecasters have been on hyper alert status, interrupting programming every few moments to warn us of impending a) rain, b) hail, c)tornadoes, d) the apocalypse, e) all of the above.

If it were hurricane season, no doubt a few of those would have been tossed in for sport.

Since we were all trapped together indoors, we were watching TiVo’d episodes of Little House on the Prairie.  And you can bank on the fact that in nearly every episode, there is at least one tornado, fire, plague, or other catastrophe.  In other words Little House on the Prairie is an awesome viewing choice if your house is filled with high strung children.

I was keeping a wary eye on the news on my miniature kitchen tv, while the Emergency Broadcasting Station kept butting into the childrens programming to alert us that rain was falling.

At one point we were only under a Tornado WATCH, instead of a WARNING (the difference being that a WARNING means that a tornado MIGHT be a good 50 miles away or so).  But behind us, the industrial sized picture window shook with a force that made me get up and look outside.  A sudden wind had picked up and the leaves from Lana the Maple Tree were swirling about in a circular motion, and the sky seemed very foreboding to my untrained eye.

With the calmest voice I could muster, I quietly said to my children, “Okay guys, lets  go to the hall just to be…” I could not hear the rest of my own sentence through all of the shrieking of my panicked children. There was much screaming and crying, emanating mostly from the 6 year old boy.

Fiddledaddy appeared in the door to his office, “What is going on?” I tried to explain that I thought it best that we just go to the hall.  But the children cut me off with accusations of MOMMY SAID THAT THERE IS A TORNADO AND WE’RE ALL GOING TO DIE!!!

And for the record, that is NOT what I said.

If looks could kill, I certainly would have been a smoldering pile of ashes on the cheap carpeting.  Fiddledaddy has never been quite the alarmist that I am.  In fact, in emergency weather situations, I think he’s a tad too lackadaisical.  Which is why I suppose we balance each other out well.

Eying his young pitiful son having a near hysterical break down, he looked at me again, “this is your fault you know.”

Yes. Yes.  I know.  And so I spent the next hour or so talking Jensen down from the ceiling fan.

This is the same child who nightly asks his father at bedtime, “Dad, is there going to be a thunderstorm?” No. “Tornado?” No.  “Hurricane?” No.  “Earthquake?” Not likely.

I don’t know where he gets all the high strungyness.  It must be from the news.

It certainly can’t be from his mother.

Who may or may not sleep in the bathtub during pending weather.  Just sayin’.

Have a fabulous AND SAFE weekend, everyone!

10 Responses to Tornado Watch

  • You brought back many memories of tropical storm alarmist weather forecasters from FL/AL… “Folks, be VERY careful, there are waves reaching up to 5 feet out there!” To which this California raised-girl went, “Huh? that’s a ripple!” Sheesh… hope you all stay safe this weekend!

  • WE have a friend who is like that and my son jut doesn’t get it….my son thinks storms are COOL! Hope the season is not too severe for you!

  • I turned on the TV a little after 9 to find them saying with alarm that there was a tornado on the ground in my area. Later found out there was a tornado about three miles from my house. Then we hear a building collapsed at SUn n Fun with 70 people trapped inside. Did I tell you my son goes to a high school academy out there and was supposed to be working the Sun n Fun? We had about 20 mins of sheer terror before getting ahold of someone to find out all students were safe. The school had wisely not released the students to work because there was bad weather coming. Talk about grateful! They later confirmed that a tornado touched down there. This was one day they were right on target for western and central Florida. Luckily no one was killed and the worst injury was a broken hip. Thank you Jesus!

  • Many moons ago, my husband and I moved to Oklahoma during the height of tornado season. As a girl raised in New Mexico, I was not accustomed to natural disasters. One of the first days we were there, my husband went off to work, leaving me home by myself. The TV was blaring out tornado warnings by county…except I had NO idea what county we were in. And I had no idea what to do in case of a tornado. LOL I was certain I was going to die that day!!

  • Our four-year-old frequently asks if there’s a “twister” coming when he hears an airplane fly over. David insists this is my fault since I may or may not be found hunkered down in the bathtub at the first sound of rumbling thunder. (Overreaction, thy name is Marian.)

  • Since I’m from Kansas I’d probably better tell you that the warning/watch thing is the other way around 🙂

    A watch means conditions are favorable for tornadoes. A warning means HEAD FOR THE BASEMENT! DOROTHY AND TOTO WILL BE FLYING BY ANY SECOND!

    A warning in Kansas means go stand in your driveway, watch for wall clouds and get to know your neighbors better.

  • We were under a watch a few times Thursday and under warning for quite some time, with one touching down about 2 miles south of us while travelling across SW Lakeland toward Bartow. My girls and I were all watching the weather closely together in my bedroom where the alert radio is and with windows facing west. When the warning sounded, I shooed everyone and the dogs into our guest bath-no windows, interior room. I then realized if the power went out (it did) I didn’t have a flashlight. I went out to get one and the sky was green, like snot green, dumb move. Then realized we wouldn’t know when the danger was past, so I went back for the radio, that is when the hail started flying at the window along with tree branches, even dumber. Poor planning on both counts. We stayed in the bathroom for about 20 minutes, coming out to find tree branches down in the yard and all the outside stuff that seemed too heavy to move blown all over the yard and into the pool. I think you can’t be too careful, but we weren’t at all panicking. Maybe some practice sessions and what if scenarios when the weather is clear would help calm the nerves. I know I always feel better with a plan when things are going bad, I just found out we need to refine ours a bit. If you check theledger dot com you will be able to see just why hanging out in the hallway was a good plan even if you didn’t actually suffer any damage.

  • We were in Florida this past week, huddled in our rented condo for the lovely weather. Good times. (Really, we had a great vacation! In between storms!)

  • When I was a little girl, I was so afraid of storms. I remember going to get in bed with my parents. My Daddy would hold me close and I felt so safe. One night, he took me to the window and made me look out at the wind and lightening and driving rain. I was terrified. He quietly told me that he would take care of me, but more importantly, God would watch over me. He asked if I could put my trust in God. He told me that when he was afraid, he would sing the hymn “I know whom I have believed” and we sang it together. I was probably 5 or 6 when he did that. As an adult, I love the sound of the thunder and wind. I almost always remember what it felt like to be in my Sweet Daddy’s arms and hear his voice asking me if I could put my trust in God. Which is a good thing, because tornado season in Albama goes from January 1-December 31. I get lots of reminders that God will take care of me!

  • Living in the northwest corner of Indiana, a suburb of Chicago, has broken me of any and all weather concerns. In fact at this moment I’m looking at a rather dark and threatening sky wondering what’s up with that. But I won’t even check the weather. I’ve colored my hair during a tornado watch (the power went out which was really annoying), and we all sleep through the tornado sirens should they go off at night.
    I figure if God has it in His plans that I go out in a twister, then so be it. Give Fiddledaddy a high-five for me! Us lackadaisical types will go out in a blaze of glory…or swirling debris 😉